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Nicholas Cooper

Kate Bush - Discography (1978-2011)




Kate Bush - Discography (1978-2011)


Kate Bush - Discography (1978-2011)




Kate Bush is one of the most influential and innovative singer-songwriters of all time. Her discography spans over three decades and includes 10 studio albums, a remix album, two live albums, two compilation albums, six video albums, four box sets, five extended plays, 36 singles, seven promotional singles, and 39 music videos. She has sold over 30 million records worldwide and has won numerous awards and accolades for her music and creativity.


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In this article, we will explore the highlights of Kate Bush's discography from 1978 to 2011, covering her artistic evolution, musical achievements, and critical reception.


The Kick Inside (1978)




The Kick Inside was Kate Bush's debut album, released when she was only 19 years old. It was a commercial and critical success, reaching number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and number 1 in four countries. The album featured the hit single "Wuthering Heights", which was inspired by Emily Brontë's novel of the same name and became the first song written and performed by a female artist to top the UK Singles Chart. The album also showcased Kate Bush's distinctive vocal style, poetic lyrics, and eclectic musical influences, ranging from folk, rock, pop, classical, and Celtic music.


The Kick Inside was certified platinum in the UK, Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and New Zealand.


Lionheart (1978)




Lionheart was Kate Bush's second album, released only nine months after her debut. It was recorded in France under pressure from her record label to capitalize on the success of The Kick Inside. Despite the rushed production, the album received positive reviews and reached number 6 on the UK Albums Chart and number 5 in the Netherlands. The album featured the singles "Hammer Horror" and "Wow", which both became top 20 hits in the UK. The album also displayed Kate Bush's theatrical flair and storytelling skills, with songs inspired by literature, history, cinema, and personal experiences.


Lionheart was certified platinum in the UK, Australia, and Canada, and gold in the Netherlands and New Zealand.


Never for Ever (1980)




Never for Ever was Kate Bush's third album and her first to be co-produced by her. It marked a significant artistic growth for her, as she experimented with more diverse sounds and genres, such as new wave, synth-pop, reggae, and jazz. The album also featured more complex arrangements and production techniques, such as the Fairlight CMI synthesizer and sampler. The album was a critical and commercial success, becoming her first to top the UK Albums Chart and reaching number 4 in the Netherlands. The album spawned three hit singles: "Breathing", "Babooshka", and "Army Dreamers", which all reached the top 20 in the UK.


Never for Ever was certified gold in the UK, Germany, Canada, the Netherlands, and France.


The Dreaming (1982)




The Dreaming was Kate Bush's fourth album and her first to be entirely self-produced. It was her most experimental and ambitious work to date, featuring a wide range of musical styles and instruments, such as world music, folk rock, art rock, avant-garde pop, didgeridoo, bagpipes, mandolin, bouzouki, balalaika, uilleann pipes, whips, and guns. The album also explored various themes and topics, such as war, crime, colonialism, animal rights, dreams, and spirituality. The album received mixed reviews from critics, who praised its originality but criticized its lack of accessibility and coherence. The album reached number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and number 5 in the Netherlands. The album produced two singles: "The Dreaming" and "There Goes a Tenner", which both failed to chart in the US but reached the top 40 in the UK.


The Dreaming was certified silver in the UK.. Here is the continuation of the HTML article that I wrote for the keyword "Kate Bush - Discography (1978-2011)": Hounds of Love (1985)




Hounds of Love was Kate Bush's fifth album and her second to be entirely self-produced. It was her most successful and acclaimed work, reaching number 1 on the UK Albums Chart and number 12 on the US Billboard 200. The album was divided into two parts: the first side, titled "Hounds of Love", contained five pop-oriented songs, including the hit singles "Running Up That Hill (A Deal with God)", "Cloudbusting", "Hounds of Love", and "The Big Sky". The second side, titled "The Ninth Wave", was a conceptual suite of seven songs that told the story of a woman who is lost at sea and faces death. The album showcased Kate Bush's musical versatility, creativity, and emotional depth, as well as her use of advanced technology, such as the Fairlight CMI, the LinnDrum, and the Yamaha DX7.


Hounds of Love was certified 2 platinum in the UK, platinum in Germany and Canada, gold in the US and France, and received numerous awards and nominations, such as the Brit Award for Best British Album in 1986.


The Sensual World (1989)




The Sensual World was Kate Bush's sixth album and her third to be entirely self-produced. It was a more mature and sensual work, featuring songs that explored themes such as love, sexuality, spirituality, and identity. The album was influenced by Irish music and culture, as well as by literary works such as James Joyce's Ulysses, T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita. The album reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart and number 43 on the US Billboard 200. The album produced four singles: "The Sensual World", "This Woman's Work", "Love and Anger", and "Rocket Man", a cover of Elton John's song that was part of a tribute album called Two Rooms: Celebrating the Songs of Elton John & Bernie Taupin.


The Sensual World was certified platinum in the UK, gold in Canada and France, and received positive reviews from critics.


The Red Shoes (1993)




The Red Shoes was Kate Bush's seventh album and her fourth to be entirely self-produced. It was inspired by the 1948 film of the same name by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, which in turn was based on the fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen. The album featured guest appearances by artists such as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Prince, Nigel Kennedy, Lenny Henry, and Gary Brooker. The album reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart and number 28 on the US Billboard 200. The album spawned six singles: "Rubberband Girl", "Eat the Music", "Moments of Pleasure", "The Red Shoes", "And So Is Love", and "Why Should I Love You?", a collaboration with Prince. The album also had a companion film called The Line, the Cross & the Curve, directed by and starring Kate Bush herself.


The Red Shoes was certified platinum in the UK, gold in Canada, and received mixed reviews from critics. Here is the continuation of the HTML article that I wrote for the keyword "Kate Bush - Discography (1978-2011)": Aerial (2005)




Aerial was Kate Bush's eighth album and her fifth to be entirely self-produced. It was her first album in 12 years, after a long hiatus from the music industry. The album was a double album, consisting of two parts: the first disc, titled "A Sea of Honey", contained 10 songs that were mostly personal and intimate, such as "King of the Mountain", "Bertie", and "Mrs. Bartolozzi". The second disc, titled "A Sky of Honey", was a conceptual suite of nine songs that followed the course of a single summer day, from dawn to dusk, featuring sounds of birds, nature, and art. The album was a critical and commercial success, reaching number 3 on the UK Albums Chart and number 48 on the US Billboard 200. The album produced two singles: "King of the Mountain" and "Deeper Understanding", the latter being re-released in 2011 as part of the Director's Cut album.


Aerial was certified platinum in the UK, gold in Germany and Canada, and received several award nominations, such as the Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album in 2007.


Director's Cut (2011)




Director's Cut was Kate Bush's ninth album and her sixth to be entirely self-produced. It was a remix album that featured reworked versions of 11 songs from her previous albums The Sensual World and The Red Shoes. The album also included a new song called "Flower of the Mountain", which was originally intended to be the title track of The Sensual World, but was rejected by the estate of James Joyce for using his words from Ulysses. The album reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart and number 83 on the US Billboard 200. The album produced three singles: "Deeper Understanding", "Moments of Pleasure", and "This Woman's Work".


Director's Cut was certified gold in the UK.


50 Words for Snow (2011)




50 Words for Snow was Kate Bush's tenth and final studio album and her seventh to be entirely self-produced. It was an album of new material that consisted of seven songs, each related to snow in some way. The album featured guest vocals by artists such as Stephen Fry, Elton John, Andy Fairweather Low, and Kate Bush's son Bertie McIntosh. The album was praised by critics for its originality, atmosphere, and musicality. The album reached number 5 on the UK Albums Chart and number 83 on the US Billboard 200. The album produced one single: "Wild Man".


50 Words for Snow was certified gold in the UK.


Conclusion




Kate Bush is one of the most influential and innovative singer-songwriters of all time. Her discography spans over three decades and includes 10 studio albums, a remix album, two live albums, two compilation albums, six video albums, four box sets, five extended plays, 36 singles, seven promotional singles, and 39 music videos. She has sold over 30 million records


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